Women in Tech - Data Ductus

We’ve been finding out more about some of the highly-skilled women in tech at Data Ductus who are crucial to the company’s and our customers’ growth.

Meet Amalia Faoziah, a Software Engineer who wants to make a difference 

How did you become interested in tech?
When I was a young kid, my dad used to challenge me to do quizzes. Unbeknown to me, they were IQ tests – building my inner computer. When I was in junior high school, I started using computers. I enjoyed playing games on them, but also setting them up and reinstalling operating systems. By the time I reached senior high, I joined a computer club and entered the Indonesian Computer Olympics, where I came in third place for the entire city region.

How long have you been working with tech?
I started working as an intern in 2010 while at University in Semarang, a coastal town in Indonesia. Once graduated, I had a spell as a freelancer before joining a large software provider, working on server apps and ATM software for banks. After six years at the company, I moved to a Singaporean start-up, where I developed the API system for a chatbot admin portal. They were located in Batam, like Data Ductus, which I joined in 2021.

What does a typical day at work involve?
We do a lot of coding in Java, which is great in my position as a software engineer. We’re both maintaining and developing network service orchestration systems, which means we cover everything from bug fixes to solving new requirement challenges. Development is sandwiched between stand-ups, which we have every morning and late afternoon since our team is spread across Europe and Asia. It’s part of a global delivery to a global client base.

What’s most interesting about your job?
It’s never the same thing twice. There’s always a new challenge – especially for someone relatively new to the company as myself. We’re given the time to explore and find solutions to challenges, whether we solve them individually or as a group. It’s the type of environment that helps you thrive as a software engineer.

What advice would you give to somebody interested in pursuing a career like yours?
Firstly, never stop learning and never underestimate yourself and your capabilities. Secondly, choose the technical area in which you want to work, and focus on getting better and better at it. Thirdly, don’t give up, your dream job is out there. And finally, don’t hold back. We can use our skills to make a difference to society – to make it a better place, together.

What do you do when you’re not crunching code?
We’re still under fairly strict Covid restrictions here in Indonesia, which means staying indoors when possible. Me and my mum spend a lot of time together, I still enjoy gaming, and I dedicate time to learning – there’s always something new and interesting in our field.

Meet Lotta Innerman, ITSM Team Lead, former developer, and signaling specialist in the army reserves

How did you become interested in tech?
I spent a lot of time hanging out with my dad as a kid. He was always building or fixing something, and I liked to help out. So, when I finished school and started working as a resource planner at Gävle University, it was natural for me to learn visual basic so I could do bug fixes and updates to the inhouse resource tool.

How long have you been working with tech?
After a few years Gävle University I took a sabbatical to do a two-year vocational IT program. On my return I became responsible for IT resource planning systems. In 2008 I joined Sandvik’s IT Services department as a developer before quickly moving into leadership roles, including Change and BI Function Manager. I left IT for a while becoming a Product Line Manager, but missed it, which is what brought me to Data Ductus.

What does a typical day at work involve?
As Application Team Lead, I’m responsible for a nine person team within the ITSM department. We essentially manage around 250 applications for the Church of Sweden in a Citirix environment. It’s my responsibility to ensure their operations run smoothly so I develop structured processes that will help improve our delivery of this. I also hold regular meetings with the team, customers and suppliers.

What’s most interesting about your job?
It’s creating structure and working with talented people. I always see the potential in people, and as a manager I do my best to create a platform from which they can develop themselves.

What advice would you give to somebody interested in pursuing a career like yours?
Be curious, be positive and be reflective. It’s important to explore and learn new things and at the same time you need to a moment to look back on your day and reflect on what happened. Knowing where you want to go and what you’ve done to achieve it will always help in life.

What do you do when you’re not working?
I love being outdoors and doing activities like skiing or mountain biking. I’m also an occasional CrossFit Coach and in the Army Reserves – working with signaling and radios.  We use everything from the latest tech gadgets to old analogue equipment, so I get to use some of the skills I learnt from helping out my dad.

Meet Mia Johanson, Line Manager, quality assurance specialist, accomplished storyteller 

How did you become interested in tech? 
My mum worked at Ericsson and I spent my summers helping out there. Over time I became more and more interested in tech and the challenges they were working to solve there. I decided to study Computer Engineering at Umeå University. 

How long have you been working with tech?  
I’ve been in the business for 20 years. I did my thesis at Ericsson and went on to work there. First with development, followed by testing. After a couple of years, I started a business with some friends, where I specialized in quality assurance across multiple industries. That’s where I came into contact with Data Ductus. I eventually joined the company in 2015.

What does a typical day at work involve? 
It’s varied. I’m a Quality Assurance Specialist, Line Manager and Project Manager. I’m developing our ways of working and managing a team of developers and projects, all with the same goal – to ensure we deliver the highest quality to our customers. In a ”typical day” I sit in scrum meetings, talk to customers and assess and refine processes and performance.

What’s most interesting about your job? 
It’s the variation. I work with teams and clients in Asia, Europe and North America – that’s a broad time and cultural span. I have a holistic view of projects and can help our consultants meet customer expectations by defining improved ways of working at every level. We have a culture of innovation here and that includes my roles too.

What advice would you give to somebody interested in pursuing a career like yours? 
Becoming a Quality Assurance Engineer is a great career. You need to be able to understand the bigger picture – from project requirements through to user needs. And you have to be able to dig deeper into any issues to find answers. It’s a skill that will open many doors.

What do you do when you’re not working? 
I like to be out in the countryside, hunting with my dog. I’m also a storyteller. I perform at theaters, cafes, people’s homes, you name it. It’s a fun way to challenge yourself and meet new people.

Meet Emina Cirkic, Software Engineer, Java / AWS Developer, former bio-medical technician

How did you become interested in tech 
I was in a six-month internship at Malmo University following three years of studies as a biomedical technician. I was fathoming out a simple front-end language and it dawned on me that this is what I wanted to do. I did a complete 180 turn and decided to pursue a career in IT. 

How long have you been working with tech?  
Having just spent three years studying, I didn’t want to do that again, so I spent 12-month on a full-time intensive Java distance learning programme. Following that, I worked as a Java developer at an industrial company for three years. I wanted to work more with the cloud, so I became AWS certified and joined Data Ductus. 

What does a typical day at work involve? 
We work in two-week sprints. We have our stand-ups, prioritize tasks and features, and spend the day developing the code. Mostly, I work in Golang. It’s a relatively new language for me, but the syntax is simpler than Java, so it was relatively easy to get to grips with it. 

What’s most interesting about your job? 
Variation. I feel like I’m learning something new and growing every day. When I joined the company I didn’t have a lot of working experience with AWS. I had the theory and now I’m applying it in a really interesting project for the energy industry. 

What advice would you give to somebody interested in pursuing a career like yours? 
There are so many opportunities, so do a little research first. Are you interested in hardware, software, or desktop? Once you know this, pick the language that will serve your interests. You need to go all in. Tutorials aren’t enough. Take a proper course and learn the theory. It will be worth it in the long run. 

What do you do when you’re not crunching code? 
I have a young family, so I like to spend time with them, especially on the weekends when we get to do more things together.  

Meet Mathilda Sjödin, Software Engineer, C-sharp expert, baking fanatic

How did you become interested in tech? 
At about five years old, I got a Super Nintendo and was hooked. By 11, I’d seen an ad for a gaming education at my local college and my future was set – I wanted to learn how to build and design games, and I did. I was the techy one around the house, setting up phones and computers and fixing any issues. 

How long have you been working with tech?  
After I graduated, I began working at Data Ductus and have been here for five years. Many of the skills I learned while studying I can apply here in my day-to-day work, such as C-sharp, HTML and CSS. And I’ve learned a lot on the job. 

What does a typical day at work involve? 
Right now I’m on maternity leave, so you can guess my typical day! But most recently I’ve been developing a website for a municipality where inhabitants can book spots at local nurseries, schools, colleges and the like. A typical day involves a customer and an internal meeting, handling a ticket and developing code – we are responsible for the entire lifecycle of the system.  

What’s most interesting about your job? 
No day is the same. IT is so broad, there is always another job to do, another project to work on, another skill to learn. If you feel like you’re stuck in a loop it’s easy to get out of it by exploring another technology. 

What advice would you give to somebody interested in pursuing a career like yours? 
Just go for it. There are so many possibilities. You can work in healthcare and if it doesn’t suit you move to retail, and so on. You will meet lots of interesting people and you can work from anywhere as long as you have an internet connection, now and then. It’s a very rewarding business. 

What do you do when you’re not crunching code? 
I love to bake. People keep telling me I should apply to a baking show, but I haven’t plucked up the courage yet. Watch this space though…